hope renewed

Standard

We got the house for real!

I dropped the check off yesterday, got the contract, just waiting on the last wire transfer and we will have the keys! We bought a bottle of Veuve Cliquot a few months ago, that we still have sitting in our wine frig. I do see us popping it over there in the empty kitchen. 😀

Also! My sleep is definitely improving. The Dr. definitely got my attention when he used some word like “psycho-physiology” describing how my insomnia got so deeply ingrained. He listened long enough and educated me well enough that I left there trusting him, which is honestly rare for me when it comes to doctors.

This morning I was reflecting on how familiar this felt to me–but on the other side of the paperwork.

During my thirty-year practice as a bodyworker, I realized I had a secret weapon.

I could get people to trust me very quickly. I don’t know if that’s just my normal personality, or a skill set I developed in that role, but I took my time, listening to every word they said, writing it all down and asking lots of questions in the intital appointment. I didn’t rush it and insured them their participation and input was valuable to me (which it was).

I then displayed (because I possessed) a deep, calm confidence that I could help them (if I did which was the vast majority of the time). AND that their body also possessed a deep well of information that would be our guide, which I would trust, to help them get back on track.

I always started the relationship with that confidence and that respect right out of the gate and something about that combination allowed my clients to trust me, and the process I was guiding them in to.

Most of the time when they found me, they were pretty desperate and in a lot of long term chronic pain. Had been through many things that had not been helpful. They were understandably skeptical.

But I knew that their trusting me was going to allow their guard to drop, and the magic would begin.

I always–every single time– coached them on not seeking improvement, but seeking change. That we were simply looking to break up the patterns of dysfunction, so their innate body-wisdom could sneak back in through those cracks and start taking over.

I’m glad I’m writing this all out, as I rarely think about my prior life as a therapist. But this process is exactly what is occurring for me now.

I may not have fully felt confident in trying this non habit-forming medication (for a relatively short time–my goal is to get back to sleeping and get off all medication) as I tried two doses before, didn’t sleep and felt like death in the morning.

But I did leave feeling like I trusted this doctor and I would submit to his expertise. He runs a damn Sleep Center for God’s sake–how can I rationalize not trusting him?

Cute little macrame I got hanging over where I’m sitting right now, enjoying a cool breeze

Since I made the decision to trust his guidance, do exactly what he said, and know that what’s happening is as much a deep psychological problem as chemical (not saying you can just decide to change these kinds of unconscious patterns by just deciding to–you have to let go and let your mind decide on its own to shift) I have started sleeping better.

He said the morning grogginess would start fading in about three days and I woke up today feeling pretty chipper.

I guess what I’m saying is it’s all about trust. And all about just letting myself be steered, then the magic starts happening. I’m stubborn. This is big.

The very first time I took this med a couple weeks ago (prescribed by my wonderful nurse practitioner), I lay wide awake tossing and turning for five hours then was a zombie the next day. The next night, basically the same thing. I gave right up on it.

But now, I’m sleeping 2-3 hours at a time and getting pretty easily back to sleep. It’s changing and getting better. I’m feeling hopeful.

Those are the great ends of the spectrum.

Some of my daffodils!

The tail that’s dragging though is the care my brother is receiving which is abysmal.

He got up yesterday and right away called his case manager, leaving a message on her voicemail that he needed an appt. with the nurse in order to obtain his meds. I know he did this because I was on the phone with my Dad and heard him in the background leaving that message.

He went all day not hearing back.

I wrote his social worker from the hospital basically detailing how her discharge plan fell off the rails with Terros right out of the gate, really just to let her know and to document it. I ended my email saying I did not expect a response, this was just to inform her.

She wrote me back, appalled, sent my email to the director of the whole shebang and gave me a number for the Clinical Director of John’s entire clinic. Oops! That lady did not end up liking that one bit.

I called the Director who let me know she would get right on it, make sure he had his appointments and the best way to get the information to him. I asked her to email me as John has a new phone and is hard to reach. I would make sure he got the info.

Mind you, he runs out of meds on Monday. It was Thursday and they are closed on the weekend. We have one day to get him in there–Friday. She assured me it would be settled by the end of the day.

The end of the day came and you guessed it–nothing.

I called her cell phone again and could hear she was driving. She was annoyed. Asked for an update and she said she had punted it to the terrible, incompetent case manager. I let her know John had called her and heard nothing. I reiterated he went in the hospital for five weeks because he went off his meds and here he was set to run out of them.

She said they were on it. I had a few choice words about the case manager like “incompetent” “terrible employee” etc. and the phone call ended abruptly. I’ve simply had it with these people. I left that thinking it all trickles down from the top. Even the Clinical Director doesn’t care about the patients there. I get it.

So I ended up calling back to the clinic to get anyone, absolutely anyone in the building who could facilitate my brother picking up his meds the next day.

I finally got likely the one and only competent person in the facility, who looked him up and saw he indeed has an appointment on the books for Friday at 10:30.

But no one told us that. And it was the next morning. They went to the trouble to schedule the appointment, but not tell the patient.

How did they expect John to be at that appt. when they never informed him of it? Look at all the great lengths I went to to simply get that one nugget of information.

The case manager kept saying in the heated staffing on John while he was in the hospital “well he didn’t show up for his appointments!” as the reason his medication got messed up.

I get it now. She does the bare minimum on paper, to prove those billable hours, then no follow-through with the actual patient. She scheduled the appointment, but never told us about it. So when he doesn’t show up, he gets marked as a no-show and no one questions it. Ya know, these unreliable mentally ill people.

I want to scream.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

I got super sad yesterday thinking of all the other people under her who she’s playing this game with, who are getting sicker, not getting services, because they don’t have someone like me hounding her to do the basics of her own damn job. And even her boss at the highest level doesn’t care. It’s a very dangerous trap.

We have about a month to navigate this I think before getting him here. I spoke with John yesterday and we both agreed he can and needs to ask for a new case manager for just that month. This woman is unsafe.

So he will be doing that today when he goes in to get his meds. Even if he gets a similarly incompetent person (as I said to my Dad, I truly can’t imagine anyone being worse than her), it sends a message.

And when this is all over, my Psychologist husband is doing something called “red-lining” this facility. I think the social worker at the hospital is engaged in something similar. At least we will be out of there, but in all good conscience for the rest of their vulnerable population, we have to speak out.

Ok, with that all being said (much of the reason I document on here is also to keep a written record), this is a gorgeous day here. I’m so happy and relieved we can start moving them here in a concrete way now.

I have so many thoughts of my Dad sitting on my patio, enjoying my flowers doing his crossword puzzle. Inviting my brother over for TV watching and pizza. Country drives showing them all these views I’ve grown to love. Simple pleasures like that.

Knowing my Dad will get to live out his life in this kind of comfort is such a relief to us all.

And when I thanked my husband the other day for so much help he’s giving my family he responded “our family”.

You see his parents died so young (both were gone by the time he was fifteen), he never got to experience an aging parent situation. He considers this a gift. He’s a true gem of a human. Of all the disastrous choices I made in dating–which were admittedly about 99% of them–I just needed one good choice and I nailed it.

And he came with this cutie

He heads back there in a little over a week and will handle most of the logistics they need on their end. Then we will fly my brother (and likely their cat) out here, and my husband is going to drive my brother’s car out here, taking a cross country road trip with my Dad. They are both really looking forward to it.

Thanks for coming along for the ride everyone. It’s been a circus, fun-house, roller coaster and glorious ferris wheel all wrapped up in to one.

And my shingles are almost entirely improved. Hooray for no long-term effects.

Have a great Friday out there.

9 thoughts on “hope renewed

  1. Patty

    Thanks for sharing another unbelievable turn of events! I will be happy to read that John’s appointment today went as planned and he has gotten the meds and blood work he so desperately needs.
    Just read all the bio’s on the Terros Executive
    Leadership Team-can’t believe they can know these things are going on and let it happen.

    Well anyway so happy your Dad and brother got the house and it is finally official! Wishing all of you better times ahead-in sickness and in health-you will be together! YES!

    • It’s some kind of shell-game there. They are invested in looking good on paper so they get funding. But obviously zero investment in actually providing those services. For example, they have lots of interesting classes and groups, but out of the hundreds of clients on their books, my brother said mostly 2-3 people show up for these classes (and they claim to also provide transportation so that’s not the issue) when they happen. Most of the time they are cancelled. I have many blog posts from 8 years ago when we went through utter hell with them and had to get our lawyer involved to just get him basic services. It is a total sham. And very few people like me holding them accountable. Scary.

  2. So much I would like to comment on, but it would end up a book. Just want you to know I am ecstatic that it is beginning to fall into place. It will soon be smooth-sailing.

    I am sure glad your sleep seems to be calming down and allowing better rest. I was on sleep meds (Ativan) for probably 10 years, not knowing what it was doing to my brain. It was hard work, but I managed ti wean off and learn to sleep with no med (or occasional Melatonin) with the help of a new and wonderful doctor.

    John’s disgusting care has me so irate. He is the luckiest brother to have you and John David.

    Your gardening is such wonderful therapy… it is often my own calming grace. enjoy — I’m sure your dad is going to be impressed and happy there.

    All the best for you ❤️

    • That’s really great that you were able to get off the Ativan! I know that wasn’t easy. I tell ya, I really was hoping for the Ambien, but he really educated me on the slippery slope of that and I get it.

  3. Lilibet

    I’m so happy that you are sleeping better and you got the house, Kathy!! I will be relieved when I hear that John got his meds. My dear husband was amazing with both of my parents. One example: Kaiser, my Dad’s monolithic provider, sent him home with a catheter we told them he wouldn’t be able to handle, and which promptly fell out. Guess who managed to get it back in place!! And the list of loving care for both of my now-deceased parents goes on. Your husband and mine are gems!

  4. The continued incompetence is astounding but unfortunately not unexpected. I love that you and your husband have made the commitment to follow through on exposing this place and the people who administrate it. Too many are just so happy to have made it out alive, and they fail to see the big picture.
    On a personal note, I loved seeing “Katiecoolady” in your responses here. It’s been quite some time since our CourtTV days & the trial when we first engaged on the SP message board. Advocates can’t stop advocating! ❤️

    • That’s right huladoula! 😉 Not only are we filing grievances, but the social worker from the hospital has escalated the issue and is forwarding my emails to higher ups. I don’t think she’s pleased at all that she went to all that trouble to make specific discharge plans , only to see them fall off the train before it left the station. Not surprising at all to me, but maybe the first time she’s seen it in such living color. Thanks for reading along. xo

Leave a Reply to Lilibet Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s